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ENDURO® FORK SEALS
Pictorial Instructions for RockShox JUDY RACE®:
 
 
 

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ROCKSHOX JUDY RACE® SEAL/OIL CHANGE

These instructions apply specifically to the 2000 and 2001 JUDY RACE®




TIP: To make some of the subsequent steps a little easier, remove just the wipers (blue) from your new Enduro Seal Kit and place them in a freezer (this will cause the inner steel sleeve to contract, reducing the outside diameter and easing installation).

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(1) Some tools and useful items to have ready: Large plastic bucket; 5MM Allen wrench; small, flat-bladed screwdrivers; 24MM socket; torque wrench; clean terry rags; 5 wt. fork fluid (10 wt for heavier riders).



(2) If you are performing the work with the fork attached to the bike, remove the front wheel, disconnect the brake cable and computer lead, etc.. Otherwise, you may want to clamp the steerer tube in a bike stand.






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(3) Use the 24MM socket to remove the top caps. You will see the compression springs inside the stanchion tubes.












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(4) Remove the compression spring from each stanchion and set them aside on a clean cloth.














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(5) If you are working with the fork detached from the bike, dumping the bulk of the oil out now will save you some time.











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(6) Remove the Rebound Adjuster Knob, located at the bottom right* fork leg, by pulling it straight down.




*All "left/right" designations given in these instructions are from the rider's perspective.









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(7) BEFORE PROCEDING, BE SURE AND HAVE A BUCKET IN PLACE BENEATH THE FORK.... Use a 5MM Allen wrench to loosen the bottom fixing bolts. Back them out so that about 6 threads are showing (do not completely remove them).










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(8) With the fixing bolts partially backed-out and the oil bucket in place, you are now ready to release the rods from the bottoms of the lowers. This is accomplished by giving a sharp, upward blow to the fixing bolts with a plastic-faced mallet (if you don't have one, don't be afraid to improvise--put something to cushion the blow against the fixing bolts and use a regular hammer). If you strike it cleanly, the the fixing bolt threads will "disappear" and the head of the fixing bolt will be resting against the casting of the lowers.









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(9)
Notice the threads have been driven into the lowers, indicating the rods have been released. BE PREPARED FOR OIL TO RUN OUT OF THE FIXING BOLT HOLES.















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(10) Once you have properly released the rods, remove the fixing bolts, and allow the oil to drain completely (if you previously dumped most of the oil out of the top, very little oil will remain to drain out of the bottom).








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(11) Separate the lowers from the stanchions by putting leverage between the fork crown and the arch of the lowers. Once the lowers begin to slide, simply pull them off.












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(12) If the drained oil is especially clouded or dirty, you may want to pour a small amount of clean fork fluid into the tops of the stanchions to flush out the remaining bad oil.







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(13) Work the rods up and down to help drain any trapped oil.

Leave the uppers to drip as you turn your attention to the lowers.












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(14) Remove the dust seal/wipers by carefully inserting a small screw driver under the outer lip of the wiper. Rockshox recommends covering the tip of the screw driver with a cloth, but it is very difficult to fit even a bare, tiny blade between the lip and the top of the lowers. It is recommended to leave the very end of the blade bare and to wrap some electrical tape around the balance of the blade to protect the paint on top of the lowers. Once the blade is pushed under the lip, exert downward pressure on the handle of the screw driver (DON'T TWIST). Don't expect a lot of movement--keep moving the blade to different positions around the wiper, insert it and pry straight up until it slowly begins to move.





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(15) Once a small gap is visible, add a second small screw driver opposite the first to pry the wiper up and out.

-Some JUDY, DUKE, and PSYLO forks may have no inner oil seal present. If your fork has an inner oil seal, proceed to step (16). If your fork does not have an inner oil seal, but has room to accept one, you may proceed to step (18) and finish the regular sequence.



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(16) Locate the point between the oil seal and the upper bushing (between the black oil seal on top, and the lighter colored upper bushing just below it). The bushing is a soft metal and can easily be scored or dented. Insert a medium-sized flat blade screw driver between the upper bushing and the oil seal. Do not gouge the bushing with the screw driver (Hint: resist the urge to twist the screw driver blade). Note that the screw driver shaft has been wrapped in rubber electrical insulating tape to protect the slider assembly. Pry the seal straight up by putting downward pressure on the handle of the screw driver.




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(17) As the seal begins to lift up, be sure and that the screw driver is not actually up against the back of the seal seating area (you don't want to scratch the metal as the screw driver comes up).






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(18) Clean out the inside of the lowers. If the old oil was particularly dirty, you may need to use some degreaser. Be sure the lowers are completely clean and dry before proceeding.



 




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(19) Lubricate the outer edge of the inner oil seals and the area of the lowers where the seals will be inserted (we recommend "Super Slick Grease" by Rock 'n' Roll Lubrication available on our "Lubes" page). This picture shows the correct orientation of the seal: Lettering on top, grooved side down.






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(20) Set the seal in place (evenly started into the machined area of the lowers) and rest the bottom of the lowers against a pad of some sort (carpet, etc.). Press the seal into the lower using a 27mm socket (turned upside down so that the broad, flat surface is pushing against the seal) and extention. As pictured, a piece of PVC pipe may also be used to seat the oil seal. Exerting even, downward pressure, fully seat the oil seals.




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(22) Remove the wipers from the freezer, lubricate their outer edge and the area of the lowers where they will be inserted. Set the wipers in place and try and start them by hand. Do not insert the edge of the wiper too far into the hole initially, or the angle will be to "steep" for the rest of the wiper to enter. Apply some body weight to get the wipers evenly started.  A large inverted socket placed with the open end resting on the wiper "flange" works very well.  The socket can be struck with a rubber mallet to seat the wiper.




 
 
 

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(23) To fully seat the wipers, use a piece of PVC pipe. Using the pipe allows weight to be applied evenly, and make corrections if the wiper begins to start unevenly. By keeping the wiper straight and applying body weight to the pipe, the wiper can be fully seated. NOTE: WE HAVE FOUND THAT USING THIS SAME PROCEDURE WITH THE PVC PIPE DOWN AND THE LOWERS PRESSED DOWN ONTO THE SEAL FROM ABOVE ACTUALLY PROVIDES MORE LEVERAGE AND CONTROL.








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(24) Be sure the stanchion tubes are clean. Apply a light coating of Super-Slick Grease, Slick Honey, PrepM, or other suspension-specific lube to the stanchion tubes and the inside of the wipers. Start the lowers onto the stanchions.









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(25) It is easier to get one wiper barely started on its respective stanchion and then get the second one started. Once the lowers are started, slide them up the stanchions.






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(26) Slide the lowers all the way up until the fork is in the "bottomed out" position.











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(27) Replace the bottom fixing bolts, torquing them to 60 inch pounds. Remember that the hollow shaft fixing bolt should be to the rider's RIGHT.


(If the fixing bolts continue to spin, rather than tighten properly, you will have to drop the springs into the stanchions, install the top caps, torque the fixing bolts, remove the top caps and springs, and proceed.)




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(28) Fully extend the fork.

For 2001 Judy Race: Fill the right leg (rider's perspective) with 130 cc's of 5 wt. Fork Fluid (higher viscosity oils may be used depending on your damping requirements). Add 30 cc of 5 wt. Fork Fluid to the left leg.

For 2000 Judy Race: Fill the BOTH fork legs with 120cc's of 5 wt. Fork Fluid (higher viscosity oil may be used for heavier riders). 









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(29) Install the springs in each stanchion tube. Replace the top caps, starting the threads by hand. Be very careful not to "cross-thread" the caps, as the threads are plastic. Torque to a maximum of 35 inch pounds.














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(30) Replace the Rebound Adjuster Knob on the bottom fixing bolt of the damping leg (rider's right).












 

©2001-2004 Real World Cycling.com





(31) You are now ready to break in your new seals. Remember to clean the top of the dust seal/wipers following each ride. Periodically lubricate the stanchions with "Stanchion Lube" by Finish Line (available on our "Lubes" page). If you have any questions or comments about these instructions, please don't hesitate to contact us by using the link below!







Info@Realworldcycling.com

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